DHPE HAS CLOSED OPERATIONS

Dear DHPE Members, Partners and Supporters,

 

It is will great sadness to announce that the Directors of Health Promotion and Education (DHPE) have finally closed our doors after being in operation for 72 years. The Association of State and Territorial Directors of Health Promotion and Public Health Education (ASTDHPPHE) dba the Directors of Health Promotion and Education (DHPE) is dissolving. As with many non-profits in recent years, DHPE has been challenged to do more with less.  

On behalf of the Board of Directors of DHPE, I want to thank all of you who have contributed to the success of DHPE over its 72-year history.  We have accomplished so much toward our shared mission of strengthening public health capacity in policy and in systems change to improve the health of all and achieve health equity. 

Although DHPE is dissolving, the programs that we collectively have worked hard to establish and maintain will be continuing under new leadership. The assets of these programs have been given to the excellent caretakers, which are highlighted below.

Again, thank you for all your hard work and support of all our programs, and we hope you will utilize some of these resources as your agency pursues future policy, systems and environmental change approaches to improve the health of our communities and the Nation!

The Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE), a nonprofit organization with our shared goals and vision, will maintain the balance of DHPE programs, that are NOT designated below, on their website. We want all of our former members and partners to reach out to SOPHE as an organizational home and/or resource for future professional development. They will be offering special membership pricing for former members of DHPE. SOPHE can be reached at: https://www.sophe.org/

Should you have a need to contact DHPE, we will have email access for a few more months at: info@dhpe.org or dsammons-hackett@dhpe.org

 

DHPE Programs and New Homes:

Systems Change for Health

Starting January 1, 2018, Carolyn Crump, PhD and James Emery, MPH - the curriculum developers for Systems Change for Health (SCH) - will be administrating and operating the program. You may view the courses at the new website: 

http://SystemsChangeForHealth.web.unc.edu 

You can learn more about the authors at: http://UNCHealthySolutions.web.unc.edu . Thank you for your continued support of and/or interest in the Systems Change for Health (SCH) training program!

Minority Internship and Fellowship Program

The Association of State Public Health Nutritionists (ASPHN) is operating the Health Equity Internship Program starting in January 2017. Please send your emails and inquiries to ASPHN Executive Director Karen Probert at internship@asphn.orgThank you for your interest in the Health Equity Internship Program!

Lupus Health Education Program

The purpose of the DHPE Lupus Health Education Program entitled LEAP is to reduce lupus related health disparities among racial and ethnic minority populations disproportionately affected by this disease by conducting a national lupus education initiative. The caretaker agreement is still under development.

National Implementation and Dissemination for Chronic Disease Prevention Initiative

The CDC-funded National Implementation and Dissemination for Chronic Disease Prevention Initiative, also referred to as Partnering4Health has come to an end. DHPE would like to thank each of you for your participation and support of the project over the past three years. Several resources have been created as a part of Partnering4Health and these resources are available to you and your affiliates to be utilized in the future. Learn more below:

  • The Partnering4Health white paper has been released.  The white paper includes both a summary documentas well as pull-outs for each focus area of physical activity, nutrition, smoke-free environments and community clinical linkages. 
  • The Partnering4Health microsite hosts the white paper as well as additional resources from the national project. The site is hosted by the Society of Public Health Education (SOPHE) at http://partnering4health.org
  • DHPE created an online sustainability course, featuring several community partners.  The course also has an accompanying toolkit created by SOPHE.
  • A  final video integrates interviews with national partners, including American Health Association, American Planning Association, and the National WIC Association, from the Denver meeting. 
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News & Press: Additional Health Promotion & Education News

New York Plans to Ban Sale of Big Sizes of Sugary Drinks

Thursday, May 31, 2012   (0 Comments)
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Source:  New York Times

May 30, 2012
New York Plans to Ban Sale of Big Sizes of Sugary Drinks
By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

New York City plans to enact a far-reaching ban on the sale of large sodas and other sugary drinks at restaurants, movie theaters and street carts, in the most ambitious effort yet by the Bloomberg administration to combat rising obesity .

The proposed ban would affect virtually the entire menu of popular sugary drinks found in delis, fast-food franchises and even sports arenas, from energy drinks to pre-sweetened iced teas. The sale of any cup or bottle of sweetened drink larger than 16 fluid ounces — about the size of a medium coffee, and smaller than a common soda bottle — would be prohibited under the first-in-the-nation plan, which could take effect as soon as next March.

The measure would not apply to diet sodas, fruit juices, dairy-based drinks like milkshakes, or alcoholic beverages; it would not extend to beverages sold in grocery or convenience stores.

"Obesity is a nationwide problem, and all over the United States, public health officials are wringing their hands saying, ‘Oh, this is terrible,'” Mr. Bloomberg said in an interview on Wednesday in the Governor's Room at City Hall.

"New York City is not about wringing your hands; it's about doing something,” he said. "I think that's what the public wants the mayor to do.”

A spokesman for the New York City Beverage Association, an arm of the soda industry's national trade group, criticized the city's proposal on Wednesday. The industry has clashed repeatedly with the city's health department, saying it has unfairly singled out soda; industry groups have bought subway advertisements promoting their cause.

"The New York City health department's unhealthy obsession with attacking soft drinks is again pushing them over the top,” the industry spokesman, Stefan Friedman, said. "It's time for serious health professionals to move on and seek solutions that are going to actually curb obesity. These zealous proposals just distract from the hard work that needs to be done on this front.”

Mr. Bloomberg's proposal requires the approval of the Board of Health, a step that is considered likely because the members are all appointed by him, and the board's chairman is the city's health commissioner, who joined the mayor in supporting the measure on Wednesday.

Mr. Bloomberg has made public health one of the top priorities of his lengthy tenure, and has championed a series of aggressive regulations, including bans on smoking in restaurants and parks, a prohibition against artificial trans fat in restaurant food and a requirement for health inspection grades to be posted in restaurant windows.

The measures have led to occasional derision of the mayor as Nanny Bloomberg, by those who view the restrictions as infringements on personal freedom. But many of the measures adopted in New York have become models for other cities, including restrictions on smoking and trans fats, as well as the use of graphic advertising to combat smoking and soda consumption, and the demand that chain restaurants post calorie contents next to prices.

In recent years, soda has emerged as a battleground in efforts to counter obesity. Across the nation, some school districts have banned the sale of soda in schools, and some cities have banned the sale of soda in public buildings.

In New York City, where more than half of adults are obese or overweight, Dr. Thomas Farley, the health commissioner, blames sweetened drinks for up to half of the increase in city obesity rates over the last 30 years. About a third of New Yorkers drink one or more sugary drinks a day, according to the city. Dr. Farley said the city had seen higher obesity rates in neighborhoods where soda consumption was more common.

The ban would not apply to drinks with fewer than 25 calories per 8-ounce serving, like zero-calorie Vitamin Waters and unsweetened iced teas, as well as diet sodas.

Restaurants, delis, movie theater and ballpark concessions would be affected, because they are regulated by the health department. Carts on sidewalks and in Central Park would also be included, but not vending machines or newsstands that serve only a smattering of fresh food items.

At fast-food chains, where sodas are often dispersed at self-serve fountains, restaurants would be required to hand out cup sizes of 16 ounces or less, regardless of whether a customer opts for a diet drink. But free refills — and additional drink purchases — would be allowed.

Corner stores and bodegas would be affected if they are defined by the city as "food service establishments.” Those stores can most easily be identified by the health department letter grades they are required to display in their windows.

The mayor, who said he occasionally drank a diet soda "on a hot day,” contested the idea that the plan would limit consumers' choices, saying the option to buy more soda would always be available.

"Your argument, I guess, could be that it's a little less convenient to have to carry two 16-ounce drinks to your seat in the movie theater rather than one 32 ounce,” Mr. Bloomberg said in a sarcastic tone. "I don't think you can make the case that we're taking things away.”

He also said he foresaw no adverse effect on local businesses, and he suggested that restaurants could simply charge more for smaller drinks if their sales were to drop.

The Bloomberg administration had made previous, unsuccessful efforts to make soda consumption less appealing. The mayor supported a state tax on sodas, but the measure died in Albany, and he tried to restrict the use of food stamps to buy sodas, but the idea was rejected by federal regulators.

With the new proposal, City Hall is now trying to see how much it can accomplish without requiring outside approval. Mayoral aides say they are confident that they have the legal authority to restrict soda sales, based on the city's jurisdiction over local eating establishments, the same oversight that allows for the health department's letter-grade cleanliness rating system for restaurants.

In interviews at the AMC Loews Village, in the East Village in Manhattan, some filmgoers said restricting large soda sales made sense to them.

"I think it's a good idea,” said Sara Gochenauer, 21, a personal assistant from the Upper West Side. Soda, she said, "rots your teeth.”

But others said consumers should be free to choose.

"If people want to drink 24 ounces, it's their decision,” said Zara Atal, 20, a college student from the Upper East Side.

Lawrence Goins, 50, a postal worker who lives in Newark, took a more pragmatic approach.

"Some of those movies are three, three and a half hours long,” Mr. Goins said. "You got to quench your thirst.”

Colin Moynihan contributed reporting. 


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